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Saturday, February 17, 2018

Book Review: Romanov by Samaire Provost

by Samaire Provost
January 24th 2018
388 pages

Genres: New Adult, Urban Fantasy
In an abandoned warehouse in Manhattan, two enemies battle to the death, while outside, a malevolent entity watches and waits and plots, eager for blood. On an island in the heart of Seattle, an immortal princess struggles to lead a normal life just as a flood of terrifying creatures starts to pour in through a portal that should not be there. A young man meets a classmate while walking home from the college library, and embarks on the most dangerous adventure he’s ever known – will he survive? A deranged madman hunts the girl he’s lusted after for a century, in a relentless pursuit for vengeance. A prehistoric, mythical beast jealously guards a primeval land, which is leaking into present-day Seattle. A sweet, forbidden passion blossoms between two lovers who steal moments whenever they can, while unbeknownst to them, they’re hunted by a deadly creature.

A royal family threatened at its weakest – yet lethal in its own right – is stalked by an ancient evil that will not rest until they are utterly destroyed: a nightmare incarnate that has waited millions of years for revenge threatens the very existence of the young lovers and their family.

Will they prevail?

I was truly excited to read this book; the premise entirely intriguing. The Romanovs, Russia’s last dynastic rulers, reside in current day Seattle having lived the past hundred years as immensely powerful vampires. History’s Romanov family is steeped in legend having assumed mythological status. Throw in the mystic Rasputin, a larger than life entity that reportedly refused to die, and you have an excellent foundation for an urban fantasy meets historical fiction tale. I eagerly brushed up on my Romanov history in anticipation of what was sure to be a riveting read.

Romanov’s strength lay in its basic premise and creativity. The historic tale fits almost perfectly as vampiric reinvention. The book borrows from several genres, increasing its marketability. Provost’s writing is best when evoking elements of horror. Suspense and eerily staged scares run throughout the book and in these moments the story is quite captivating.

Ultimately, however, the book wasn’t for me. There are many plot inconsistencies I simply couldn’t reconcile. There are threads throughout the book that are abandoned or developed to no end. For me, a simplistic storyline well told trumps an overambitious plot that misses the mark. The dialogue is a strange combination of antiquated and colloquial; even with Eric, a completely modern college student. At times during my reading, I thought maybe the tale would make a great series; that the story might find its footing as a series. By story’s end, however, the reader is assured Romanov is standalone in a conclusion that left me disappointed and more than a little confused. I’ll assume some responsibility for my own disappointment. Perhaps this history/fantasy buff had set her expectations a bit too high.

2 ½ Sheep

Bianca Greenwood

About the Author:

Samaire Provost lives in California with her husband and son.
Her love of paranormal stories, odd plots, and unique tales as well as the works of Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, Susan Cooper, Madeleine L’Engle and Stephen King has deeply influenced her writing.




  1. My father escaped from Russia in a potato sack and changed his name when he got to the States. His last name had been Romanov ;). Since I was a very young girl I have been interested in this family. I think this should be a great read bringing them into modern times ;). Thank you.

    1. That's cool. Getting to hear first-hand what things were like for your family.

  2. I want to know more about that ancient evil.